Current Exhibit:

August 9 - September 29 2019

MANNY MARTINS-KARMAN   Wanderlust (Getting Lost)   Born in Faro Portugal, Manuela (Manny) Martins-Karman is a contemporary visual artist in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada.  Manny’s paintings are layered bursts of energy that record experience. She gets physical with broad uninhibited gestures resulting in a purely emotional response. Manny creates art that holds and dominates the room through color, form, and line. Using large brushes, rollers, dripping or even throwing paint she creates intersections of emotions and thoughts that invites viewers to become part of the process.  Working primarily in acrylic, Manny loves to switch it up with water colour, mixed media, and drawing. She is an active artist with original paintings held in private and corporate collections in Canada and internationally.  “Abstraction is a world that depicts an artist’s imagination. I want to live in that world and learn the language.”  Her exhibit,  Wanderlust (Getting Lost)  explores the urge “to get up and go” That irresistible and overwhelming feeling to hit the road, join nature, or just get lost – all in the simple pursuit of amusement, fun or pleasure. This is wanderlust.  Gathering inspiration from a recent road trip across Canada and the United States, Manny Martins-Karman, a Portuguese-born artist living and working in Winnipeg, uses the simplest form of visual language to describe her own wanderlust experience. Her new series of paintings is an abstract representation of what wanderlust feels and looks like. With her masterful use of shapes, brush strokes and colour, she gently encourages you to get lost in the work and take part in the journey with her.  Kick up highway dust to explore and enjoy  Wanderlust (Getting Lost) .

MANNY MARTINS-KARMAN

Wanderlust (Getting Lost)

Born in Faro Portugal, Manuela (Manny) Martins-Karman is a contemporary visual artist in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada.

Manny’s paintings are layered bursts of energy that record experience. She gets physical with broad uninhibited gestures resulting in a purely emotional response. Manny creates art that holds and dominates the room through color, form, and line. Using large brushes, rollers, dripping or even throwing paint she creates intersections of emotions and thoughts that invites viewers to become part of the process.

Working primarily in acrylic, Manny loves to switch it up with water colour, mixed media, and drawing. She is an active artist with original paintings held in private and corporate collections in Canada and internationally.

“Abstraction is a world that depicts an artist’s imagination. I want to live in that world and learn the language.”

Her exhibit, Wanderlust (Getting Lost) explores the urge “to get up and go” That irresistible and overwhelming feeling to hit the road, join nature, or just get lost – all in the simple pursuit of amusement, fun or pleasure. This is wanderlust.

Gathering inspiration from a recent road trip across Canada and the United States, Manny Martins-Karman, a Portuguese-born artist living and working in Winnipeg, uses the simplest form of visual language to describe her own wanderlust experience. Her new series of paintings is an abstract representation of what wanderlust feels and looks like. With her masterful use of shapes, brush strokes and colour, she gently encourages you to get lost in the work and take part in the journey with her.

Kick up highway dust to explore and enjoy Wanderlust (Getting Lost).

JONATHAN DYCK   Printed Work, 2009-2019   Jonathan Dyck is an illustrator, designer and cartoonist who grew up in Winkler, Manitoba and is now based in Winnipeg — Treaty 1 territory.  His illustrations and comics have appeared in publications such as Reader’s Digest Canada, The Walrus, Maisonneuve, U of T Magazine, Geez, Alberta Views, GUTS Magazine, Briarpatch, Prairie Fire, and U of M Magazine. His illustrated books include the anthology  Unsettling the Word: Biblical Experiments in Decolonization  (MC Canada and Orbis Books), and the children’s book  Where Do Sticky Buns Come From? , which earned him the 2018 Manuela Dias Award for Children’s Illustration. His work has been recognized at the Manitoba Book Awards, the Alberta Magazine Awards, the National Magazine Awards, and the Canadian Church Press Awards.  Jonathan’s work combines digital and traditional media with a foundation in observational drawing and printmaking. As an illustrator and designer, the majority of his creative work is responsive — made in service of a larger project or goal, with some consideration about how it will be received by its audience. His work doesn’t necessarily have to be straightforward but it does often have to communicate something. This is the nature of commercial work. In a field dominated by digital media, traditional printmaking has a been a fruitful way for him to encounter the material limitations of image making and reproduction. With these limitations as part of his process, his work explores narrative ambiguity, engages with his religious background, and pushes for an emancipatory politics.

JONATHAN DYCK

Printed Work, 2009-2019

Jonathan Dyck is an illustrator, designer and cartoonist who grew up in Winkler, Manitoba and is now based in Winnipeg — Treaty 1 territory.

His illustrations and comics have appeared in publications such as Reader’s Digest Canada, The Walrus, Maisonneuve, U of T Magazine, Geez, Alberta Views, GUTS Magazine, Briarpatch, Prairie Fire, and U of M Magazine. His illustrated books include the anthology Unsettling the Word: Biblical Experiments in Decolonization (MC Canada and Orbis Books), and the children’s book Where Do Sticky Buns Come From?, which earned him the 2018 Manuela Dias Award for Children’s Illustration. His work has been recognized at the Manitoba Book Awards, the Alberta Magazine Awards, the National Magazine Awards, and the Canadian Church Press Awards.

Jonathan’s work combines digital and traditional media with a foundation in observational drawing and printmaking. As an illustrator and designer, the majority of his creative work is responsive — made in service of a larger project or goal, with some consideration about how it will be received by its audience. His work doesn’t necessarily have to be straightforward but it does often have to communicate something. This is the nature of commercial work. In a field dominated by digital media, traditional printmaking has a been a fruitful way for him to encounter the material limitations of image making and reproduction. With these limitations as part of his process, his work explores narrative ambiguity, engages with his religious background, and pushes for an emancipatory politics.

GERD BEHRENDT   A Celebration of Life   Gerd Behrendt lives in Riding Mountain. He is a retired farmer and cattleman. Always a nature lover, he now has time to travel, hike, and paint what he sees, using the emotions he feels.  Born in Germany and growing up during the war and post-war years diminished his hopes for a formal education in the arts. He was married in Germany and came to Canada in the 1950s, seeking freedom and security. He chose farming as an occupation. His family expanded to five ad they enjoyed life on a small ranch near Langruth, Manitoba. After his children were grown his wife encouraged him to fulfill the dream of his youth, creating with pencil and brush. She died in 1987 after a short illness.  Taking art classes, sometimes twice a week in Winnipeg and Brandon, Gerd had to make a two hundred mile return trip in an evening, when his classes ran from 7:30pm-10:00pm.  Gerd’s works have been exhibited in many places throughout Manitoba, Ontario, and Alberta. Collectors from as far as Japan enjoy his paintings from the heart. In 1991, Gerd remarried and retired from farming. He moved to Riding Mountain. His devotion to the visual arts is supported by his wife who also enjoys the outdoors. His feelings are infused in every new artistic creation, which he hopes to be a pleasant experience for the viewer.  The name of this exhibition,  A Celebration of Life , comes from Gerd’s 25 year residency in and around the Village of Riding Mountain. Every painting is a statement of what he has perceived over these many years, and his feelings for this place. Growing vegetables, flowers, and tending the lawn and trees are revealed in his impressions on canvas. Friends, neighbours, and the small country store with the Post Office in it, have all contributed to the paintings in this show.

GERD BEHRENDT

A Celebration of Life

Gerd Behrendt lives in Riding Mountain. He is a retired farmer and cattleman. Always a nature lover, he now has time to travel, hike, and paint what he sees, using the emotions he feels.

Born in Germany and growing up during the war and post-war years diminished his hopes for a formal education in the arts. He was married in Germany and came to Canada in the 1950s, seeking freedom and security. He chose farming as an occupation. His family expanded to five ad they enjoyed life on a small ranch near Langruth, Manitoba. After his children were grown his wife encouraged him to fulfill the dream of his youth, creating with pencil and brush. She died in 1987 after a short illness.

Taking art classes, sometimes twice a week in Winnipeg and Brandon, Gerd had to make a two hundred mile return trip in an evening, when his classes ran from 7:30pm-10:00pm.

Gerd’s works have been exhibited in many places throughout Manitoba, Ontario, and Alberta. Collectors from as far as Japan enjoy his paintings from the heart. In 1991, Gerd remarried and retired from farming. He moved to Riding Mountain. His devotion to the visual arts is supported by his wife who also enjoys the outdoors. His feelings are infused in every new artistic creation, which he hopes to be a pleasant experience for the viewer.

The name of this exhibition, A Celebration of Life, comes from Gerd’s 25 year residency in and around the Village of Riding Mountain. Every painting is a statement of what he has perceived over these many years, and his feelings for this place. Growing vegetables, flowers, and tending the lawn and trees are revealed in his impressions on canvas. Friends, neighbours, and the small country store with the Post Office in it, have all contributed to the paintings in this show.

ROBERT NICKEL   The Natural World In Photos   Robert Nickel lives in Winnipeg. He has always been fascinated by the natural world. As a growing boy, he spent a lot of time in the forests around his home. Birds and animals held him in awe. Their ability to fend for themselves impressed him. As he grew older and became involved with the things of daily living and making a living, he lost touch, to some extent, with this side of his being.  In 1985 good friends presented him with a field guide to the birds of Eastern North America and he was hooked in a big way. Since then his love of the natural world has been rekindled. Those close to him would say it has become almost an obsession.  What makes his work more urgent is the fact that the natural world is fighting to survive. When he drives by some of his childhood haunts, he very often doesn’t recognize them. Where there were forests and blooming prairies, there are now housing developments, fast food restaurants, petrol stations and parking lots. Where have all the birds and animals gone? Some of them are having difficulty finding a home and have been put on the endangered list. Their beauty and ability to “make a living” should be an example to us of nature’s capacity to care for all of us, if we would only pay attention. It is Robert’s hope and conviction that his photographs will fan the embers in people’s hearts and awaken is some small way, a recognition of the beauty that is all around us. Birds and animals have a remarkable resiliency.

ROBERT NICKEL

The Natural World In Photos

Robert Nickel lives in Winnipeg. He has always been fascinated by the natural world. As a growing boy, he spent a lot of time in the forests around his home. Birds and animals held him in awe. Their ability to fend for themselves impressed him. As he grew older and became involved with the things of daily living and making a living, he lost touch, to some extent, with this side of his being.

In 1985 good friends presented him with a field guide to the birds of Eastern North America and he was hooked in a big way. Since then his love of the natural world has been rekindled. Those close to him would say it has become almost an obsession.

What makes his work more urgent is the fact that the natural world is fighting to survive. When he drives by some of his childhood haunts, he very often doesn’t recognize them. Where there were forests and blooming prairies, there are now housing developments, fast food restaurants, petrol stations and parking lots. Where have all the birds and animals gone? Some of them are having difficulty finding a home and have been put on the endangered list. Their beauty and ability to “make a living” should be an example to us of nature’s capacity to care for all of us, if we would only pay attention. It is Robert’s hope and conviction that his photographs will fan the embers in people’s hearts and awaken is some small way, a recognition of the beauty that is all around us. Birds and animals have a remarkable resiliency.

Artist Talks & Receptions:

Join us for good conversation, good food, and good wine with this season’s feature artist, Winnipeg artist and renowned print maker, Miriam Rudolph!

Join us for good conversation, good food, and good wine with this season’s feature artist, Winnipeg artist and renowned print maker, Miriam Rudolph!

Previous Exhibit:

May 30 - July 31 2019

MIRIAM RUDOLPH   disPOSESSION   Miriam Rudolph was born and raised in Paraguay, South America. In 2003 she moved to Canada to study Fine Arts at the University of Manitoba where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours in 2007 and a Bachelor of Education in 2010. She completed a Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking at the University of Alberta, Edmonton in February 2017. She has taught printmaking at the University of Alberta and the Alberta College for Art and Design in Calgary in 2018. She recently moved back to Winnipeg and currently teaches printmaking at the University of Manitoba. She has received numerous awards and scholarships. She has shown her work nationally and internationally in Canada, the USA, Paraguay, Portugal, Croatia, Taiwan, and China.   disPOSSESSION  is a body of work that explores the accumulation of wealth of few and the displacement of many with a focus on the expansion of soy and beef production, ensuing environmental, social, and economic consequences, as well as connected indigenous land rights and peasant food sovereignty issues. Rudoloh explores the disappearance of the dry forests of the Paraguayan Chaco due to deforestation, the idea of enclosure as a symbol of privatization and capitalist systems, the struggle to maintain diversity through seed saving traditions in the face of expanding monocultures, and the displacement of local populations due to land grabs. While her research and imagery pertain to a specific region in South America, the issues she addresses are global issues and also lend themselves to comparison with Canada's – and other countries' - colonial heritage and agricultural practices.

MIRIAM RUDOLPH

disPOSESSION

Miriam Rudolph was born and raised in Paraguay, South America. In 2003 she moved to Canada to study Fine Arts at the University of Manitoba where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours in 2007 and a Bachelor of Education in 2010. She completed a Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking at the University of Alberta, Edmonton in February 2017. She has taught printmaking at the University of Alberta and the Alberta College for Art and Design in Calgary in 2018. She recently moved back to Winnipeg and currently teaches printmaking at the University of Manitoba. She has received numerous awards and scholarships. She has shown her work nationally and internationally in Canada, the USA, Paraguay, Portugal, Croatia, Taiwan, and China.

disPOSSESSION is a body of work that explores the accumulation of wealth of few and the displacement of many with a focus on the expansion of soy and beef production, ensuing environmental, social, and economic consequences, as well as connected indigenous land rights and peasant food sovereignty issues. Rudoloh explores the disappearance of the dry forests of the Paraguayan Chaco due to deforestation, the idea of enclosure as a symbol of privatization and capitalist systems, the struggle to maintain diversity through seed saving traditions in the face of expanding monocultures, and the displacement of local populations due to land grabs. While her research and imagery pertain to a specific region in South America, the issues she addresses are global issues and also lend themselves to comparison with Canada's – and other countries' - colonial heritage and agricultural practices.

TERRY HILDEBRAND   Sets in Situations   Originally from a small town in Manitoba, Terry Hildebrand graduated with an Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the University of Minnesota in May 2014. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours degree from the University of Manitoba in 2007. From 2009-2011 he worked as studio technician in the ceramics department at the University of Manitoba. From 2016-2018, he taught at the Medicine Hat College while at the same time participating in residencies at Medalta and the Banff Centre. Terry has been part of numerous exhibitions in Canada and the USA, such as the Clay and Glass Gallery in Waterloo, ON, The Alberta Craft Council Gallery in Edmonton, NCECA in Minneapolis to name a few. Terry works currently as a full time artist in Winnipeg, Manitoba.  The sharing of food, drink, fellowship, and play lie at the heart of our existence and the conscious ritual and enjoyment of these are greatly enhanced by the experience of the visual and tactile senses that the ceramic wares address. Hildebrand makes ceramic work out of porcelain and stoneware, with a focus on drinking vessels. He fires the pieces in a soda, salt or wood kiln to give them a delicate flashing of reds, oranges, blues and greens. The earthy tones reflect the earthen qualities of clay. He presents his work in groupings, often on wooden or ceramic trays. Good craftsmanship, ergonomics, and visual balance are important in his work. The main purpose of his utilitarian ceramic work is undeniably its function. The ritual of its use becomes a central experience. He creates playful sets that entice the users to interact with each other and the tray. The user has to be careful and considerate with the placement of a cup, an opposition to the mass-produced, disposable plastic and paper cups. It brings back the conscious action of drinking and using a vessel. Hildebrand’s work creates a critical distance to the consumerist way of life in the user by requiring conscious considerations of the patterns, the forms and the placements of individual pieces.

TERRY HILDEBRAND

Sets in Situations

Originally from a small town in Manitoba, Terry Hildebrand graduated with an Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the University of Minnesota in May 2014. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours degree from the University of Manitoba in 2007. From 2009-2011 he worked as studio technician in the ceramics department at the University of Manitoba. From 2016-2018, he taught at the Medicine Hat College while at the same time participating in residencies at Medalta and the Banff Centre. Terry has been part of numerous exhibitions in Canada and the USA, such as the Clay and Glass Gallery in Waterloo, ON, The Alberta Craft Council Gallery in Edmonton, NCECA in Minneapolis to name a few. Terry works currently as a full time artist in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The sharing of food, drink, fellowship, and play lie at the heart of our existence and the conscious ritual and enjoyment of these are greatly enhanced by the experience of the visual and tactile senses that the ceramic wares address. Hildebrand makes ceramic work out of porcelain and stoneware, with a focus on drinking vessels. He fires the pieces in a soda, salt or wood kiln to give them a delicate flashing of reds, oranges, blues and greens. The earthy tones reflect the earthen qualities of clay. He presents his work in groupings, often on wooden or ceramic trays. Good craftsmanship, ergonomics, and visual balance are important in his work. The main purpose of his utilitarian ceramic work is undeniably its function. The ritual of its use becomes a central experience. He creates playful sets that entice the users to interact with each other and the tray. The user has to be careful and considerate with the placement of a cup, an opposition to the mass-produced, disposable plastic and paper cups. It brings back the conscious action of drinking and using a vessel. Hildebrand’s work creates a critical distance to the consumerist way of life in the user by requiring conscious considerations of the patterns, the forms and the placements of individual pieces.

BARB STAFFORD-MCCLUSKEY   tex.ture   McCluskey was born and raised in New Brunswick. Her oil paintings depict her concern with nature’s vanishing spaces. Predominantly self taught McCluskey studied commercial art, only to return to canvas to paint.  McCluskey’s inspiration has always been experiencing firsthand the sights, trails, and scenery of our country. She believes the dramatic ocean storms of her youth can be as exhilarating as the prairie’s amazing summer storms lighting up the skies. Anything at hand is a tool, her preference being palette knives, working the surface quickly comfortable in her unique style.

BARB STAFFORD-MCCLUSKEY

tex.ture

McCluskey was born and raised in New Brunswick. Her oil paintings depict her concern with nature’s vanishing spaces. Predominantly self taught McCluskey studied commercial art, only to return to canvas to paint.

McCluskey’s inspiration has always been experiencing firsthand the sights, trails, and scenery of our country. She believes the dramatic ocean storms of her youth can be as exhilarating as the prairie’s amazing summer storms lighting up the skies. Anything at hand is a tool, her preference being palette knives, working the surface quickly comfortable in her unique style.

KAE SASAKI   I know a place where the wild thyme blows   Kae Sasaki is a Japanese-born Winnipeg painter trained at School of Art at University of Manitoba where she received Alice Hamilton Painting Prize, Cecil C. Richards Memorial Award, Lynn Sissons Memorial Scholarship and Sculptural Experience Commission Award. Kae has been shortlisted in the Kingston Prize (2015/2017), the Salt Spring National Art Prize (2017) and the Jackson’s Open Painting Prize (2018/2019) and her studio practice has been generously supported by multiple grants from Winnipeg Arts Council and Manitoba Arts Council.  In her work, Sasaki seeks an imaginative revitalization of the narrative and atmospheric potential of painting. She negotiates the ability of painting to create visual worlds that are both familiar and extraordinary, rooted in everyday corporeal and spatial experiences, yet taking off into the synthetic domain of image-signs. The layered meanings in her paintings emanate from a profound emotional connection to life experience that allows her to engage her interest in perception, memory and narrative with the ever-evolving, often conflicting nature of contemporary Canadian painting.

KAE SASAKI

I know a place where the wild thyme blows

Kae Sasaki is a Japanese-born Winnipeg painter trained at School of Art at University of Manitoba where she received Alice Hamilton Painting Prize, Cecil C. Richards Memorial Award, Lynn Sissons Memorial Scholarship and Sculptural Experience Commission Award. Kae has been shortlisted in the Kingston Prize (2015/2017), the Salt Spring National Art Prize (2017) and the Jackson’s Open Painting Prize (2018/2019) and her studio practice has been generously supported by multiple grants from Winnipeg Arts Council and Manitoba Arts Council.

In her work, Sasaki seeks an imaginative revitalization of the narrative and atmospheric potential of painting. She negotiates the ability of painting to create visual worlds that are both familiar and extraordinary, rooted in everyday corporeal and spatial experiences, yet taking off into the synthetic domain of image-signs. The layered meanings in her paintings emanate from a profound emotional connection to life experience that allows her to engage her interest in perception, memory and narrative with the ever-evolving, often conflicting nature of contemporary Canadian painting.

Other Events at Gallery in the Park:

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Visit us during the annual Pembina Valley Studio Tour!

Saturday September 7, 10:00am-6:00pm

Sunday September 8, 12-5:00pm